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Skylab Concept by George Mueller
Skylab Concept by George Mueller
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Saturns Rings
Saturns Rings
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Moon Set over Earth
Moon Set over Earth
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Tracks to Antares
Tracks to Antares
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Shuttle Test Using Electron Beam
Shuttle Test Using Electron Beam
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STS-43 Launch
STS-43 Launch
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STS-56 Launch
STS-56 Launch
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STS-57 Launch
STS-57 Launch
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STS-60 Launch
STS-60 Launch
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STS-64 Launch
STS-64 Launch
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First View of Earth from Moon
First View of Earth from Moon
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Flying Saucer Aliens
Flying Saucer Aliens
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STS-57 Launch Featured Image

STS-57 Launch

The first flight of the commercially developed SPACEHAB laboratory module begins with the flawless liftoff of the Space Shuttle Endeavour from Launch Pad 39B at 9:07:22 a.m. EDT, June 21, 1993. Also planned for the eight-day flight of Mission STS-57 is the retrieval of the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). Onboard for the fourth flight of Endeavour are a crew of six: Mission Commander Ronald J. Grabe; Pilot Brian Duffy; Payload Commander G. David Low; and Mission Specialists Nancy Jane Sherlock, Peter J.K. "Jeff" Wisoff, and Janice E. Voss. The first launch attempt on June 20 was scrubbed due to unacceptable weather conditions both at KSC and the overseas contingency landing sites

© NASA

Little Joe 5B High-Q-Abort Test
Little Joe 5B High-Q-Abort Test
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Vanguard Satellite SLV-2 Being Examined at Cape Canaveral
Vanguard Satellite SLV-2 Being Examined at Cape Canaveral
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Wright Flyer Test Flights at Fort Myer, VA
Wright Flyer Test Flights at Fort Myer, VA
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First Flight of a Liquid Propellant Rocket
First Flight of a Liquid Propellant Rocket
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Wright Brothers 1906 Patent
Wright Brothers 1906 Patent
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Behold one of the more stunningly detailed images of the Earth yet created
Behold one of the more stunningly detailed images of the Earth yet created
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International Year of Astronomy 2009
International Year of Astronomy 2009
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Stunning light shows in a planets atmosphere
Stunning light shows in a planets atmosphere
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Robot Arm Over Earth with Sunburst
Robot Arm Over Earth with Sunburst
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Chicago Welcomes the Apollo 11 Astronauts
Chicago Welcomes the Apollo 11 Astronauts
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Andromeda Galaxy
Andromeda Galaxy
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Behemoth Black Hole Found in an Unlikely Place
Behemoth Black Hole Found in an Unlikely Place
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International Year of Astronomy 2009 Featured Image

International Year of Astronomy 2009

In celebration of the International Year of Astronomy 2009, NASA's Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- have produced a matched trio of images of the central region of our Milky Way galaxy. Each image shows the telescope's different wavelength view of the galactic center region, illustrating the unique science each observatory conducts. In this spectacular image, observations using infrared light and X-ray light see through the obscuring dust and reveal the intense activity near the galactic core. Note that the center of the galaxy is located within the bright white region to the right of and just below the middle of the image. The entire image width covers about one-half a degree, about the same angular width as the full moon. Spitzer's infrared-light observations provide a detailed and spectacular view of the galactic center region [Figure 1 (top frame of poster)]. The swirling core of our galaxy harbors hundreds of thousands of stars that cannot be seen in visible light. These stars heat the nearby gas and dust. These dusty clouds glow in infrared light and reveal their often dramatic shapes. Some of these clouds harbor stellar nurseries that are forming new generations of stars. Like the downtown of a large city, the center of our galaxy is a crowded, active, and vibrant place. Although best known for its visible-light images, Hubble also observes over a limited range of infrared light [Figure 2 (middle frame of poster)]. The galactic center is marked by the bright patch in the lower right. Along the left side are large arcs of warm gas that have been heated by clusters of bright massive stars. In addition, Hubble uncovered many more massive stars across the region. Winds and radiation from these stars create the complex structures seen in the gas throughout the image.This sweeping panorama is one of the sharpest infrared pictures ever made of the galactic center region. X-rays detected by Chandra expose a wealth of exotic objects and high-energy features [Figure 3 (bottom frame of poster)]. In this image, pink represents lower energy X-rays and blue indicates higher energy. Hundreds of small dots show emission from material around black holes and other dense stellar objects. A supermassive black hole -- some four million times more massive than the Sun -- resides within the bright region in the lower right. The diffuse X-ray light comes from gas heated to millions of degrees by outflows from the supermassive black hole, winds from giant stars, and stellar explosions. This central region is the most energetic place in our galaxy

© NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA/CXC/STScI

Crew Escape Vehicle Thermal Protection System
Crew Escape Vehicle Thermal Protection System
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The Earth & Moon
The Earth & Moon
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Earth
Earth
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A Sky View of Earth From Suomi NPP
A Sky View of Earth From Suomi NPP
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Pale Blue Dot Revisited
Pale Blue Dot Revisited
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STS-72 Landing
STS-72 Landing
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Return to Flight Launch of Discovery
Return to Flight Launch of Discovery
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Columbia 180 Turn and Burn
Columbia 180 Turn and Burn
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Lunar Orbiter I Launch
Lunar Orbiter I Launch
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NASA Langley Magnetic Suspension/Balance System
NASA Langley Magnetic Suspension/Balance System
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Hermes A-1 Test Rockets
Hermes A-1 Test Rockets
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NASA JF-104A Starfighter
NASA JF-104A Starfighter
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Pale Blue Dot Revisited Featured Image

Pale Blue Dot Revisited

For the 30th anniversary of one of the most iconic images taken by NASA's Voyager mission, a new version of the image known as "the Pale Blue Dot." Planet Earth is visible as a bright speck within the sunbeam just right of center and appears softly blue, as in the original version published in 1990 (see PIA00452). This updated version uses modern image-processing software and techniques to revisit the well-known Voyager view while attempting to respect the original data and intent of those who planned the images. In 1990, the Voyager project planned to shut off the Voyager 1 spacecraft's imaging cameras to conserve power and because the probe, along with its sibling Voyager 2, would not fly close enough to any other objects to take pictures. Before the shutdown, the mission commanded the probe to take a series of 60 images designed to produce what they termed the "Family Portrait of the Solar System." Executed on Valentine's Day 1990, this sequence returned images for making color views of six of the solar system's planets and also imaged the Sun in monochrome. The popular name of this view is traced to the title of the 1994 book by Voyager imaging scientist Carl Sagan, who originated the idea of using Voyager's cameras to image the distant Earth and played a critical role in enabling the family portrait images to be taken. The image of Earth was originally published by NASA in 1990. It is republished here to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Family Portrait of the Solar System (see PIA00451) and the Pale Blue Dot image in particular. The planet occupies less than a single pixel in the image and thus is not fully resolved. (The actual width of the planet on the sky was less than one pixel in Voyager's camera.) By contrast, Jupiter and Saturn were large enough to fill a full pixel in their family portrait images. The direction of the Sun is toward the bottom of the view (where the image is brightest). Rays of sunlight scattered within the camera optics stretch across the scene. One of those light rays happens to have intersected dramatically with Earth. From Voyager 1's vantage point — a distance of approximately 3.8 billion miles (6 billion kilometers) — Earth was separated from the Sun by only a few degrees. The close proximity of the inner planets to the Sun was a key factor preventing these images from being taken earlier in the mission, as our star was still close and bright enough to damage the cameras with its blinding glare. The view is a color composite created by combining images taken using green, blue and violet spectral filters by the Voyager 1 Narrow-Angle Camera. They were taken at 4:48 GMT on Feb. 14, 1990, just 34 minutes before Voyager 1 powered off its cameras forever. Like the original version, this is technically a "false-color" view, as the color-filter images used were mapped to red, green and blue, respectively. The brightness of each color channel was balanced relative to the others, which is likely why the scene appears brighter but less grainy than the original. In addition, the color was balanced so that the main sunbeam (which overlays Earth) appears white, like the white light of the Sun. At its original resolution, the newly processed color image is 666 by 659 pixels in size; this is Figure A. The main image is an enlarged version. The image was processed by JPL engineer and image processing enthusiast Kevin M. Gill with input from two of the image's original planners, Candy Hansen and William Kosmann. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA23645

Supernova SN1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Supernova SN1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud
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''Eagle'' In Lunar Orbit
''Eagle'' In Lunar Orbit
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Endeavour is Delivered to the Kennedy Space Center
Endeavour is Delivered to the Kennedy Space Center
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Earth from Apollo 8
Earth from Apollo 8
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Electrical Storm
Electrical Storm
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SR-71 Landing with Drag Chute
SR-71 Landing with Drag Chute
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Full Earth
Full Earth
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STS-86 Launch
STS-86 Launch
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Pioneer F Plaque Symbology
Pioneer F Plaque Symbology
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Apollo 4 Launch
Apollo 4 Launch
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Buzz Aldrin and the U.S. flag on the Moon
Buzz Aldrin and the U.S. flag on the Moon
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New York City Welcomes the Apollo 11 Astronauts
New York City Welcomes the Apollo 11 Astronauts
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Astronaut Charles Duke with Lunar Rover on Moon
Astronaut Charles Duke with Lunar Rover on Moon
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1902 Wright Brothers' Glider Tests
1902 Wright Brothers' Glider Tests
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